How Do I Diagnose Golfer's Elbow?


If you are experiencing elbow pain and suspect you have Golfer's Elbow, the best way to diagnose this condition is with a quick visit to the your doctor for a physical examination of your elbow, arm and wrist. Getting a proper diagnosis is important so you can treat your condition correctly.

Range of motion movements / tests, will be done to see how much movement has been lost in the elbow and arm; the doctor will be looking for tenderness at the elbow bones on the inside of your arm. Your elbow might hurt from the doctor poking and prodding at it, but by doing this the doctor will know for sure the source of your pain, the level of tenderness in and around your elbow and how well your elbow can move with this condition.

Your doctor may also consider any previous elbow injuries or joint stiffness that you may have had in the past. This will help the doctor to determine if you have a more complex injury in your elbow and rule out any other elbow injuries that may be present.

Untreated chronic elbow pain can cause bone spurs and/or the break down tendon tissue in your elbow, becoming even more painful than before. Keep in mind, however, your symptoms may be caused by a similar condition to golfer's elbow having similar symptoms in the elbow, forearm, wrist, or hand.

Your doctor may also consider any previous elbow injuries or joint stiffness that you may have had in the past. This will help the doctor to determine if you have a more complex injury in your elbow and rule out any other joint injuries that may be present.


Medical History

Understanding your medical history and individual lifestyle will help your physician provide the best diagnosis possible. To begin with, your doctor will gather a medical history about you and your current condition and symptoms; they will also inquire about the intensity of your present pain, the duration of your symptoms and the limitations you are experiencing (i.e. does it hurt when you move your wrist). The diagnosis will be based on:

  • The severity and duration of your injury
  • Your level and type of pain (does it hurt during or after activity or do you experience pain all the time? Do you experience pain while flexing your fingers, turning your wrist, or only when extending your forearm?)
  • How your symptoms are affecting your lifestyle (Are your symptoms mildly aggravating or causing you to limit or stop normal, daily activity?)
  • Your general health and well-being
  • Your age and current level of physical ability
  • Your participation in activity
  • What instigated the problem, when it started
  • Have you had this problem (or something similar) before?

Your physician will discuss what factors led to your injury. This can include investigating the techniques, equipment, and training used in your activity, sport, or occupation. The duration of your injury will determine whether you are suffering from acute (short term) or chronic (long term) Golfer's Elbow. Some treatments are only suitable for short term symptoms while others are used to effectively heal chronic injuries.

Lateral epicondyle, olecranon photograph man
Medial epicondyle, olecranon photograph man

All of these things will indicate to your physician, the severity of your injury. This will help them determine which type of conservative treatment will provide the most effective healing. Depending on the duration and severity of the injury, you may even require surgery. It is important to speak to your physician as soon as possible to limit potential damage to your elbow and start the healing process.


Physical Examination

A physical examination will be performed to determine if you are suffering from golfer's elbow and not some other condition with similar symptoms. During your physical exam, your doctor will visually assess your elbow by asking you to extend and flex your elbow, wrist, and fingers. During these exercises, your doctor will place pressure on certain areas of your arm; if the physician is looking specifically for tennis elbow, he/she will be sure to put some pressure near the medial epicondyle - the bony bump on the inside of your elbow.

Your physical exam will help your physician asses your range of motion, muscle and grip strength, joint stability, and pain. Pain or discomfort communicates to your doctor that the muscles, tendons, joints, or tissues may not be healthy. A physical examination of your arm will alert your physician to any physical abnormalities. This could include inflammation, swelling, bone deformity, or atrophied muscle.

Typically, your medical history and physical exam will give your physician enough information to make a diagnosis. If your doctor believes that your symptoms are due to something other than Golfer's Elbow, further testing will need to be done to determine the correct diagnosis.

It is rare that more complex diagnostic techniques will be used to diagnose golfers' elbow, but they can be effective in helping determine the cause of your symptoms. An X-Ray, which uses short electromagnetic radiation waves to create an image, can help your doctor get a detailed picture of your bone structure. This can help determine if you are suffering from a bone related condition such as arthritis, gout or a fracture to any bone in your elbow.

Other tests like a bone scan, MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or blood tests may be done if an x-ray looks normal or the doctor is unsure whether you have a fracture. These tests will also rule out any infections of the bone or tissue.

Your body is a complex system; everything is interconnected. Because of this, problems in your neck, shoulder, or arm could cause symptoms similar to golfers' elbow, An MRI or Magnetic Resonance Imaging sends out a strong magnetic field and radio waves over your body. This creates an image of your bones and soft tissues. An MRI can help doctors see if there is an issue in another part of your body.

Lateral view of the arm and muscles

An EMG or Electromyography test uses small wires placed in your muscles to detect any changes in nerve signals during movement. When assessing your elbow, this test is helpful in determining if your symptoms are being caused by a pinched nerve.

Your physician will check for inflammatory conditions such as bursitis and osteochondritis. The most common form of elbow bursitis is olecranon bursitis - read more about it here. Elbow osteochondritis affects the cartilage or bone of the elbow joint and shares many similar symptoms to epicondylitis.



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Struggling To Get Rid Of Golfer's Elbow?

The good news is that most cases of golfer's elbow will heal with simple home conservative treatments and surgery is often not needed. It's generally understood by doctors and surgeons, that surgery will introduce more scar tissue into the elbow. This added scar tissue will be problematic, requiring visits to the Physio clinic and conservative treatment options post-surgery. This is why surgery is only performed as a last resort for chronic elbow injuries or a fractured bone that won't heal with conservative treatment methods.

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Use An Elbow T•Shellz Wrap®:

  • After swelling and inflammation have been reduced with cold compression.
  • Before exercise or workouts to warm up your elbow to prevent re-injury.
  • Before and after golfer's elbow surgery, during rehabilitation, to warm up your elbow before PT exercising or stretching.
  • Anytime you feel your elbow has stiffened up, is tight and your mobility is reduced causing you more pain.
  • Anytime you have sore or aching tissue in and around your elbow.
  • Any other situation where you need to increase blood flow to your elbow to relax your soft tissue, relieve pain, prevent re-injury and enhance flexibility of your tissue.
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If you want to avoid re-injury, or manage pain and increase circulation for lifelong health benefits, an Elbow TShellz Wrap will provide exceptional results. Why spend time in pain, off from work, and missing out on your active lifestyle when you can be proactive about your injury and the health of your body? Talk to your doctor about incorporating a regular routine of using Circulation Boost into your everyday health regimen.

If you are still uncertain which route to go or if you would like to discuss issues affecting your elbow or other soft tissue injuries, then do not hesitate to contact a AidMyTennisElbow Advisor immediately by phone North America Toll Free 1-866-237-9608 | Outside North America +1-705-532-1671 or email service@mendmeshop.com


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During your recovery, you will probably have to modify and/or eliminate any activities that cause pain or discomfort at the location of your soft tissue injury until the pain and inflammation settle. Always consult your doctor and/or Physical Therapist before using any of our outstanding products, to make sure they are right for you and your condition. The more diligent you are with your treatment and rehabilitation, the faster you will see successful results!


 
 

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